Rain water Harvesting,Water Storage/Conservation for Beating the Drought

Water Saving Ideas to Beat The Drought and Rainwater Harvesting Systems

With the current drought situation in Kent (2012) and the rest of South East England due to the lack of rain since 2010 it is becoming more essential to find ways to conserve water and to provide sources for storing additional water to beat the drought if you need to water your garden etc.

The photo below shows water butts connected to a gutter downpipe and connected together to allow all three water butts to be filled directly from the downpipe when it rains. This allows a total of 600 litres (3x200 litres) of water to be stored in these water butts. The IBC tanks are also connected directly to the gutter down pipe and store a combined 2000 litres of rainwater.

Rainwater Harvesting, Water Saving & Conservation to Beat The Drought Water ButtsWater Tanks for Collecting RainwaterIBC Water Tanks for Rainwater Harvesting

If you have any comments or suggestions about this article please use the contact page

With the current drought situation in Kent and the rest of South East England due to the lack of rain it is becoming more essential to find ways to conserve water and to provide sources for storing additional water to beat the drought if you need to water your garden etc.

Photo of Water Butts for Water saving rainwater in the garden

Using water tanks to capture or harvest rainwater can also help to reduce your water bill if you are on a water meter. By 2015 Southern Water propose to meter all properties in their supply area and South East Water by 2020 so very soon it will be worth investing in water saving devices. Standard water butts can be used but normally will only hold around 200 litres of rainwater which can easily be used up in a day or two to water a large garden.

I have investigated various methods to store additional volumes of water in the most cost effective way. 

Large volume water tanks are ideal unless you have sufficient space to store large numbers of small water butts or rainwater tanks. A cheap water butt can be made from reused juice tanks holding around 200 litres which cost around £10 compared to £30-£35 for a purpose built water butt. Another efficient way to save water would be by installing flow meters in your home to control the amount of water being used. 

 

IBC Water Tanks for Rainwater harvesting & water saving, conservation to beat the droughtIntegrated Bulk Containers (IBC) are used for transport of various liquids either foodstuffs or chemicals and normally hold 1000 litres.

If you can get hold of IBCs that have been used for transporting foodstuffs then they make ideal water storage tanks. It is best to avoid ones used for chemical transport to avoid contamination unless the tanks can be cleaned. Rainwater storage-connecting water tanks to beat the drought

IBCs are usually supplied in a metal cage as per the photo which allows for easy stacking on pallets for transport but also allows them to be stacked for connection to guttering down pipes for maximum rain water collection efficiency. Large juice tanks can also be used and can hold approx 1500 litres of rainwater but are very high – about 1.8 metres tall.

You should also bear in mind the weight that these rainwater tanks will be when full. Each litre of water weighs 1kg so a full 1500 litre water tank will weigh over one and a half tonnes (1500kg)! It is therefore essential to make sure the ground beneath the tank is able to support such a weight.

Use of IBC containers for storage of 1000 litres of rainwater means the equivalent of 5 water butts can be stored in a tank 1 metre square. 1500 litre rainwater containers. Rainwater harvesting is increasingly being promoted as an environmentally friendly way of reducing the impact of water usage and also a way of reducing your water bills if your water supply is metered.

Once in a tank water pumps can be used to move the water around. These pumps can be purchased from as little as £30 which can be a cost effective way to pump water.

Suppliers of IBC Tanks

http://www.rainharvesting.co.uk/products/pumps.htm

http://www.smithsofthedean.co.uk/Recycled%20Containers.htm

DV Fuels -IBC Tanks- Wrexham

If you can get hold of IBCs that have been used for transporting foodstuffs then they make ideal water storage tanks. It is best to avoid ones used for chemical transport to avoid contamination unless the tanks can be cleaned.

IBCs are usually supplied in a metal cage which allows for easy stacking on pallets for transport but also allows them to be stacked for connection to guttering down pipes for maximum rain water collection efficiency. Large juice tanks can also be used and can hold approx 1500 litres of rainwater but are very high – about 1.8 metres tall.

 

IBC Water Tanks connected to rainwater saving system

You should also bear in mind the weight that these rainwater tanks will be when full. Each litre of water weighs 1kg so a full 1500 litre water tank will weigh over one and a half tonnes (1500kg)!

It is therefore essential to make sure the ground beneath the tank is able to support such a weight. Use of IBC containers for storage of 1000 litres of rainwater means the equivalent of 5 water butts can be stored in a tank 1 metre square.

1500 litre rainwater containers are also available which have previously been used for orange juice transport.

Rainwater harvesting is increasingly being promoted as an environmentally friendly way of reducing the impact of water usage and also a way of reducing your water bills if your water supply is metered.

Once in a tank water pumps can be used to move the water around. These pumps can be purchased from as little as £30 which can be a cost effective way to pump water.

Friends of St Margaret's Church, Rainham, Kent

There will soon be information about the Friends of St Margaret's Church, Rainham here.

Photo of St Margarets Church Rainham Kent Photo of St Margarets Church Rainham Kent

 

To visit the St Margaret's Church, Rainham web site, please click here.

 

This is a copy of a menu card from the Tudor Cafe, date is probably about 1938 - shows the prices that were charged for tea, coffee, cakes, etc.

Tudor Cafe Menu Rainham Kent 1938
Even allowing for inflation they seem very low to me - but the cost of labour was far lower in proportion to other costs than than it is now (and my impression has always been that my parents were not very good 'business people' - e.g. would charge very low prices so as to be 'fair' and not aim for reasonable profits by putting up costs to a higher level!)

Tudor Cafe Menu Rainham Kent 1938Tudor Cafe Menu Rainham Kent 1938

What was the cost of Building a New House in Woodside,Wigmore in 1939?

My grandparents purchased a plot of land in Woodside in 1939 to build their own property when the whole area was being sold as individual plots for people to build on. The construction began in July 1939 and was completed in March 1940 despite the war starting and my grandfather being called up.

The invoice from the builder for constructing their bungalow is shown below. There are not many houses that you could build for £430 now! Bear in mind this was just the house building and the plot was purchased separately. You can read about the sale of plots across the area here Wigmore Estate Plans from 1912

Click on the image for a detailed version

 

 

The builder was SC Leadbetter & Co of 105 Bedhurst Road, Wigmore, Builders, Decorators and General Repairs.

Subcategories

Historical tales

Local Events

Photos

Rainham Life